Three Important Things Christians Need to Know About Earth Day



Yesterday, believers around the world gathered in local assemblies to celebrate the resurrection of the God-Man, Jesus Christ, from the dead. The Christian celebration originates from the belief that the Second Person of a Triune God – who had previously and eternally been spirit – took on the flesh of humanity by making himself an embryo and implanting himself in the womb of a virgin. The infinite God took on a finite body, the Creator put on Creation like a coat and entered our world in order to die for those who believe in him. Proving his deity real and his atonement for sins fully received, he rose again from the dead.

Today, pagans live out Romans 1:19-20 and celebrate the creation rather than the creator.



For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. 20 For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world,[g in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. 21 For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Claiming to be wise, they became fools, 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images resembling mortal man and birds and animals and creeping things.

The supposition of Earth Day, which is celebrated each year on April 22, is that Earth is fragile and should be loved and worshipped by its subjects, who happen to be human beings. The concept of a day to worship the planet was thought up in 1969 by a hippy named John McConnell, who suggested the day be held near or around the Spring equinox, a common holy day among earth-worshipping pagans. It also happens to the birth of Vladmir Lenin, and the holiday remains wildly popular among Communists and globalists.

However, the Earth is not fragile. The created world is held up the Word of Christ’s power (Hebrews 1:3). God instructed mankind to have dominion over the world (Genesis 1:28) and we are to exploit its resources, mine its minerals, eat and wear its animals, and cut down its forests to provide us heat and shelter.

Every time an oil rig fracks the ground, pharmaceuticals are tested on mammals, or we figure out how to churn out one more chicken on the poultry factory farm assembly line, God is glorified by the dominion we are taking over the Earth.

First, Earth Day is a Religious Observance

However, pagans who deny the supremacy of Christ and his ultimate authority over the world’s resources, worship the Earth as though it is a dumb, deaf, blind little deity that has to be cared for. These simple-minded and superstitious Earth-worshippers even believe that man has the power to change the weather, manipulate the seasons, or exhaust the world’s abundant resources!

You can bet your bottom dollar that the public school did not teach children about the crucifixion on Good Friday, but these religious zealots will be teaching your children about Earth worship today.

The outdoor clothing brand, North Face, kept their stores open on Resurrection Sunday, but are closing all stores in celebration of Earth Day today. It is, indeed, a religious observance.



Thousands of websites offer liturgy samples for religious Earth Day celebrations. These include blessings, invocations, and traditions taken from more formal religions but applied to “Mother Earth.”

Almost everyone recognizes that Earth Day truly is a religious holy-day, which the Washington Post running an article only hours ago about why “Christians Should Embrace This Hippy Holiday.”

The day itself stems from a concept called Earth Religion, which is a part of neo-paganism. Stemming back to the worship of the goddess Gaia, people have been worshipping the Earth as a deity and – like all false gods – view themselves as caretakers of the idol.

Second, Suggestions for How to Worship on Earth Day Grow Increasingly Bizzare.

The Sierra Club recommended this year to take a vacation somewhere you don’t have to wear clothes because when you pack luggage it kills fuel economy (I kid you not, this is the link). They also suggest “plogging,” a sport which involves squatting to pick up trash along the roadway, instead of going to the gym. So if you see someone doing squats along the highway today, just now they’re Earth worshippers and this is a part of their religious observance.

One environmentalist organization offers 12 steps you can partake in to prepare your hearts and minds for Earth Day (sort of like Lent, but for tree-huggers).

They suggest:

Hold a Council of All Beings in your school, congregation, or community center. Each participant in the circle speaks for another life-form — an animal, plant, tree, body of water, etc., expressing the being’s concerns. You might talk about threats to the being’s habitat or freedom, the effects of pollution, natural disasters, and wars. After all the beings have spoken, talk as humans about your responsibilities to correct some of the environmental and cultural injustices you have identified.

This weirdness is responsible for stuff like you see in the video below:

This website offers 21 ways to celebrate Earth Day (the most intriguing one is to fight capitalism, because climate change is caused by capitalism, supposedly. By the way, one should look at the air quality in Red China, fyi).

In Richmond, the Earth worshipper will be rounding up oyster shells to ‘recycle’ them from restaurants, giving them over to a local university who will spawn new oysters inside them. You know, because of an oyster shortage or something (bet you a shiny nickel they don’t care about in-vitro fertilization or ‘snowflake’ babies).

In San Francisco they have a naked bike ride (ouch?) in honor of Earth Day (or, they can paint their bodies in black or wear trash bags to represent garbage). Because, again, Earth Day requires nudity for some reason.

Some areas have Earth Day Fashion Shows, debuting only used and recycled clothing (but at least they’re clothed).

Third and Finally, Earth Day is Not About Conservation

The Creation Mandate of Genesis 1 implies the work of stewardship and conservation. We should not cut down all the trees, because then we would run out of trees to cut down. We should not shoot all the deer, or else Bambi won’t be available to eat next year. We should not till up all the top-soil, or else it will blow away in the wind.

Every good Christian who operates from a Christian worldview is a conservationist. But the heart of conservation is not the honor of the Earth, but the proper and longterm exploitation of the Earth. We do conservation not because we love the Earth, but because we love taking from it.




The agenda pushed on Earth Day by its founders and the radicals who continue to promote it aren’t operating from the perspective of conservation, but worship.

To Christians, the Earth is Christ’s footstool, and little more. It was given for man, that we might disturb its surface, mine its minerals, ensare its fish and foul, and hunt or raise every creeping thing and beast of the field for the purpose of eating its flesh and wearing its skin (and maybe for testing dangerous drugs). That’s the Biblical view of Earth in relation to mankind and our Creator.


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