Why Do Minorities Fabricate Hate Crimes?

Amari Allen (left), Kyle J. Howard (middle), Jussie Smollet (right)

Why are so many minorities fabricating hate crimes against themselves? What’s up with this cultural phenomenon?

Amari Allen is a 12-year-old girl who claimed that white boys held her down and cutting off a couple of her dreds. After working up the community into a frenzy against such racist teens, she admitted that the story was fabricated.

The New York Times’s division of the Ministry of Truth erased the ethnic implications from the headlines when it was determined her account was fraudulent, as though race was not front-and-center of the story.

The NYT took race out of the headlines when the story was known as fraudulent.

Despite almost everyone having the hunch her story was made up (social media’s “Baloney Meter” was going through the roof immediately), the story still gained traction nationwide.

There are countless other accounts of minorities (ethnic minorities, sexual minorities, religious minorities, etc) making up asinine tales of oppression that never happened. Most famously, Jussie Smollett claimed that men in MAGA hats tried to lynch him. Among evangelicals, Beth Moore’s colonized nephew, Kyle J. Howard, regularly recalls fictionalized, imaginary tales of oppression that he never experienced and never ever happened.

It is well known among the law enforcement community that the perpetrators of “alt-right vandalism” on progressive churches are almost never found, and it’s usually suspected to have been self-committed by the church clergy. The same goes for homosexuals who have anti-gay graffiti done to their home or car; it is almost always self-perpetrated.

The question is ‘Why are people playing the victim?’

The answer is, “It pays.”

There are actually tangible benefits to playing the victim, even if you have not been victimized. There are two reasons.

MARXIST VICTIMOLOGY

John McWhorters’ book Losing the Race, calls this concept “vicitmology.” Victimology is the “adoption of victimhood as the core of one’s identity – for example, like one who suffers through living in a country and who lived in a culture controlled by rich white people.”

Making victimology into an identity category is how Marxist ideology converts people to hate and anger against one another. Within victimology, oppression is actually a commodity. Because commodities can be exchanged like currency, it actually helps for people to accumulate for themselves victimhood. And if they have no real victimhood, like Jussie Smollett or Kyle J. Howard, they will make it up.

McWhorter, defining victimology, explains the three problems with “playing the victim.” First, victimology condones weakness in failure. Victimology tacitly stamps approval on failure, lack of effort, and criminality. Second, victimology hampers progress because, from the outset, it focuses attention on obstacles. For example, in Black liberation Theology, the focus is on the impediment of black freedom in light of the Goliath of white racism. And third, victimology keeps racism alive because many whites are constantly painted as racist with no evidence provided.

Therefore, there are blacks who claim to have been lynched but made their own noose, homosexuals who claim ‘fag’ was spray-painted on their car but they were the ones who did it, United Methodist pastors drawing swastikas on their own church buildings after hosting an interfaith event, young women claiming to have been raped but fabricated the story, and Kyle J. Howard claiming that the wolverines he grew up hunting in Alaska were racists.

CRITICAL RACE THEORY STORYTELLING

Critical Race Theory utilizes what is called “storytelling” or sometimes “counter-storytelling. Because there is no evidence of “systemic prejudice” in the United States that can be demonstrated statistically or with empirical data, this perpetual victim mentality must be perpetuated somehow.

Without being able to prove such things as “White Privilege” or “Systemic Racism” using hard figures or real evidence, CRT values the telling of personal anecdotal stories more than facts.

For example, we are told to believe that blacks have a higher chance of being shot by cops than whites solely based upon the individual anecdotes of minority voices who have felt mistreated. Even though the evidence demonstrates otherwise, it is understood that you cannot question the story told by a minority individual without being called racist or bigoted.

It is assumed that we must believe the stories of oppression as told by individuals. Therefore, we must believe that Amari Allen had her dreds cut off, Kyle J. Howard was in a gang, and Jussie Smollett was lynched. However, none of the above was true.

Until we stop incentivizing victimhood and stop believing every story we are told, we will have more sad accounts of beautiful little girls like Amari Allen who feel they have to lie about being oppressed in order to be loved and valued.


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